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Voices of Nolij – Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

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Voices of Nolij – Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

Nolij celebrates Asian American and Pacific Islander heritage month and stands in solidarity with the AAPI community in the midst of a difficult year of pain and fear. Asian American and Pacific Islanders have enriched America’s culture and society and are instrumental in our future success as a nation. We proudly support diversity and inclusivity in the workplace and appreciate the varied cultures, languages, and religions of the vibrant AAPI community.

Thank you Jane, Ellen, Thidarat, Gurwinder, Su, Ivy and Shivane for contributing your skills and energy to the success of Nolij!

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Leadership Thoughts

Can’t we just TeleEverything? I’ve got Netflix to Binge Watch!

telemedicine
telemedicine

Can’t we just TeleEverything? I’ve got Netflix to Binge Watch!

While money cannot buy happiness, it can certainly buy time. This truism is the driving philosophy of successful companies like Netflix, Uber, Uber Eats, Grubhub, Peloton, Amazon, Instacart and HelloFresh. These companies have come to define the convenience economy with business models based on giving back time, today’s leading currency, to customers. As a busy entrepreneur, I certainly take advantage of many time-saving services like prescription deliveries and telehealth visits.

In fact, the time Americans waste while waiting to be seen by a doctor equates to $1.5 billion a year. Anyone who has ever checked out of a hospital knows that “you’ll be going home today” really means maybe by 4:00 pm. Yet, despite the downfalls of in-person appointments, telemedicine did not take off until the pandemic hit in 2020. The question is, why?

Why Did It Take A Pandemic For Telemedicine To Flourish?
I think the answer lies in the convergence of convenience, willingness to take risks to get it, and policy changes spurred by Covid-19. If a man paddleboarding across the Hudson River to make a meeting or jumping into an Uber (although our mothers told us never to get in a car with a stranger!) is any indication, consumers are ready to take risks for the sake of convenience.

Before the lockdown began last year, people were afraid it might be too risky to see a doctor online due to fear of receiving an inaccurate diagnosis. Because of the shutdowns, however, telehealth became the only way to get medical attention and was a safer alternative to in-person care.

To facilitate the expanded use of telehealth services for healthcare delivery, the government issued temporary regulatory changes. These changes, including adjusted payments for telehealth services, have allowed doctors to stay in business and continue treating the sick. These changes most likely will become permanent.

The Future of Telemedicine
In the 1964 illustrated sitcom, The Jetsons, Elroy Jetson complains that he is not feeling well and has to stay home from school. Rather than take him to the doctor, his mother Jane calls up the doctor on the videophone. Today this retro-futuristic vision of telehealth visits has become a reality.

The digital health industry has improved the patient-provider relationship through mobile apps, patient portals, wearable health sensor devices, and app-based symptom checkers. We will continue to see more AI-driven tools that bring the tactile senses to telehealth visits.

The most important change coming down the road is the transformation of the healthcare delivery model to a value-based one where providers, hospitals, and physicians receive payments based on patient health outcomes. New value-based programs stress a team-oriented, network approach to patient care management that involves coordinating care through the responsible sharing of patient data. Adopting healthcare technology like electronic health record systems creates an online system view that allows healthcare providers to readily track and measure patient outcomes. In value-based healthcare models, primary, acute care, and specialty care are united in a coordinated group approach, led by a patient’s primary physician, who directs the patient’s care team. Telehealth will be vital to ensuring that medical teams can conveniently work with patients without the inundation of time-consuming in-person visits.

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Voices of Nolij: Celebrating Women’s History Month

Leo Faal

Voices of Nolij: Celebrating Women’s History Month

In celebration of Women’s History Month, Nolij would like to acknowledge and honor the extraordinary women who keep our company growing year after year. Leo Faal, a financial analyst, exemplifies every woman who does not let her circumstances deter her from fulfilling her ambitions and following her dreams. Thank you Leo for making the brave journey from The Gambia and contributing to the success of Nolij through your skills, dedication and energy.

“I arrived in New York City in 1990 from the small country of The Gambia in West Africa when I was 17 years old. My ideas of the United States were shaped by movies that celebrated America as a land of possibility and I dreamed of moving here one day to better my life. As a small country, Gambia did not offer many advanced educational or career opportunities after high school. I am the youngest of seven children and lost my father when I was four years old. It had been drilled into me by my hardworking mother that education is the key to a successful life. My cultural education began in New York City, where I found everything to be big, exciting, and a little scary—especially the busy highways! Within months of moving to the United States, I was very fortunate to find a wonderful family who gave me friendship, a home, and a college education. I lived with my new adopted family for 12 years before getting married. After I got married, I became a stay-at-home mother to my two children for 16 years. Although I previously held retail sales positions at stores like Nordstrom, Nolij helped launch my career in finance. I began as an adult intern in the finance department and then transitioned to a full-time financial analyst. As a mature woman entering the job market for the first time, Nolij, a woman-owned company, gave me an extraordinary opportunity to grow professionally. Nolij supports and understands women’s life circumstances and the choices we make because of our families. As my teen daughter now starts her educational journey as a Frederick Douglass Distinguished Scholar, I echo my mother’s words to her often—’education is the key to the whole world and it’s never too late to make your dreams a reality.’ ”

Leo Faal,
Financial Analyst

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Insight

Is A Post-Implementation Review Critical to Project Success?

Is A Post-Implementation Review Critical to Project Success?
Is A Post-Implementation Review Critical to Project Success?

Is A Post-Implementation Review Critical to Project Success?

Finishing a project in IT does not mean the same thing as ending the project management timeline. A Post Implementation Review (PIR) is conducted after completing the project and is one of the most important aspects of the project life-cycle because it ensures that the organization benefits from the project’s outcome. The objective of system enhancements and software upgrades is not an end in itself but rather to address the specific business needs. It is for this reason a PIR is crucial to a successful project. A PIR evaluates whether project objectives were met, how effectively the project was run, lessons for the future, and the actions required to maximize the benefits from the project outputs. This, no doubt, is the real measure of success.

In 2020, for example, Nolij was tasked by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Foreign Agriculture Service (FAS) to do an independent PIR of their mission-critical Integrated Management Administrative Resource Tool (iMART) and their Production, Supply, and Distribution (PSD) systems after enhancements had been made. In collaboration with two FAS stakeholder groups, a team of senior business analysts from Nolij analyzed months of data to determine whether critical FAS business processes were being supported and help decision-makers improve investment decisions. The primary benefit of iMART to FAS is its unique ability to manage and integrate USDA’s strategic planning with human resources, logistics, and financial activities associated with overseas operations. The PSD system underpins the critical analysis and market intelligence that is foundational to the FAS mission of expanding U.S. agricultural exports through trade policy initiatives, marketing activities, and trade capacity projects. The PSD is the primary data system for global agricultural production, trade, consumption, and stocks.

Nolij analyzed months of data from PSD and iMART and provided recommendations on IT architecture, project management, customer acceptance, business process support and boosting high-performance in the workforce. Additionally, the concluding report included:

  1. Evaluation of return on investment (ROI) to date; an objective cost versus anticipated savings appraisal
  2. Assessment of enterprise architecture, IT infrastructure and system functionality by measuring performance, security risks and mitigation strategies
  3. Determining impact to stakeholders by evaluating business process support and FAS investment decision-making processes for IT projects

Working on the PIR for USDA was a wonderful collaborative opportunity for the Nolij business analyst team as demonstrated by the praise received from the FAS PSD project manager: “Thanks for the high-quality effort and results!” For Nolij, helping customers reach their business goals defines our success.

Learn more about Nolij Consulting and how we can advance your business goals at Nolijconsulting.com.